Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Spread the Joy and Not the Germs



I have a dear friend who whenever she gets a cold always says, "I like to spread the joy and not the germs."  She then sequesters herself away in the quiet of her home, giving herself the time and space it takes to heal.  This is not only very considerate and appreciated, it is also very wise because we clean our entire endocrine system while we are healing from a cold. 

Most of the time I am successful at preventing colds and flus.  But if I start to have that little tickle or even just find myself entertaining the thought that I might sense a cold coming on, then I jump on it and take a few doses of either my homemade Super Tonic and or a mega dose of about 5-10,000 IU of Vitamin D or a small handful of about 4 to 6 capsules of Beta-1,3/1,6-D-Glucan, which is a mushroom based super immune booster and incidentally a highly regarded cancer fighter as well.  Most often that will do the trick.  But, if for some reason, all of that doesn't knock it, and I really can't afford to be sick, then I do Dr. Schulze's super cold stopping routine.  I'll also chew some garlic and take some very hot baths to cook and kill the pathogens.  Then I tuck myself into bed so I can sweat it out overnight and I'm usually well by morning.

Sometimes, however, I simply surrender, get out and wave my white hankies, clear the engagements from my calendar and settle in for a little time away from time.  Then, I spend my days lying down, eating very little and drinking lots of low glycemic veggie juices and clear broths.  I tuck in with some of my favorite old movies and books and simply try my best to enjoy the ride.

After I've had a cold, I like to wait until all of my coughing is completely gone before going out in public again.  Even though my own body may have rounded the corner a week or so before that, with my immunity having overcome the invasion of the virus or bacteria, it is important to remember that those little buggers are now going to be intent on doing what they do best, which is looking for another host to infect.  And how is that best done?  By becoming airborne.  

Every sneeze and cough, if properly backlit, reveals itself to be a cloud of minute particles of mucus each containing a little glob of the very pathogens that are looking for entry into another set of lungs or eyes or nostrils etc.  So, if you can still hear it in your voice, or are having just a little lingering cough, try to resist the temptation to get back into the swing of things and rest instead so that you too will only 'spread the joy and not the germs.'

© Josephine Laing, 2016











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